House Lawmakers Warn Administration Against Letting Iran Join WTO

A bipartisan group of four lawmakers cautioned the Obama administration against allowing Iran to join the World Trade Organization, as Tehran tries harder to regain its footing on the global stage.

Last year, Iranian trade minister Mohammad Reza Nematzadeh said accession to the WTO has become a top priority of the government in Tehran since the completion of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action agreement, which aims to ensure that Iran’s nuclear program is developed only for peaceful purposes.

“America’s ability to impose financial or economic sanctions against Iran may be constrained if Iran were to accede to the WTO,” Reps. Grace Meng (D-N.Y.), Dave Reichert (R-Wash.), Peter Roskam (R-Ill.) and Juan Vargas (D-Calif.) wrote in their letter to U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman. “The U.S. and other WTO Members should not be forced to defend against potential WTO disputes if we continue to impose sanctions against Iran.”

“Despite implementation of the JCPOA, Iran’s hostile behavior remains unchanged,” they added. The lawmakers requested Froman provide them with answers to questions regarding U.S. policy toward Iranian accession, and whether the U.S. will block Iran’s efforts to join the WTO.

The United Kingdom, the European Union and Switzerland have all thrown their support behind Iranian accession, the lawmakers said.

Reichert is chairman of the House Ways and Means subcommittee on trade, while Roskam helped lead the unsuccessful effort to overturn the JCPOA.

Briefings

Washington Brief: Trump Tax Plan to Slash Business Rates, Boost Deductions for Individuals

President Donald Trump today is scheduled to outline the pillars of his plan to rewrite the U.S. tax code, with provisions such as lowering the rate for pass-through businesses to 15 percent from 39.6 percent and cutting the corporate rate. He’s not expected to endorse the border adjustment tax sought by House GOP leaders, but he plans to include a tax break for child-care expenses, viewed as a possible sweetener for Democrats.

Load More