Lamar Smith Subpoenas Tech Companies in Clinton Email Probe

House Science, Space and Technology Committee Chairman Lamar Smith issued subpoenas Monday to three tech companies that provided software and services used by Hillary Clinton to support her private email server during her tenure as secretary of State.

The Texas Republican says the subpoenas should shed light on whether the Democratic presidential nominee’s server had been in compliance with the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s cybersecurity standards and to “obtain the information necessary to answer questions about the structure and security of the email system,” in a statement.

“Companies providing services to Secretary Hillary Clinton’s private email account and server are not above the law,” Smith said. “These companies have failed to comply with our committee’s request for documents and interviews that would provide information critical to understanding Secretary Clinton’s private server and informing policy changes in how to prevent similar email arrangements in the future.”

In July, Smith sent letters to the heads of the three firms pressing the companies for information on their products’ impact on Clinton’s email server security. Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee Chairman Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) co-signed those letters.

Smith and Johnson signed letters to the three companies again today.

Clinton bought a product made by SECNAP Network Security Corp. in June 2013 to “perform threat monitoring of the network” connected to the private email server, according to a letter sent by Smith and Johnson to the firm’s chief executive, Victor Nappe.

In 2013, she purchased a product made by Datto, Inc., to provide a way to immediately recover backup data if the email server had crashed, according to the lawmakers’ letter to Datto Chief Executive Austin McChord. Platte River Networks provided “information technology services” for Clinton’s server, according to Smith and Johnson’s letter to the company’s Chief Executive, Treve Suazo.

The companies did not respond to immediate requests for comment regarding Clinton’s use of their products and services.

Johnson said that he hoped the information derived from the subpoenas could help shape policy going forward.

“The companies have direct and unique knowledge of her private server and email account,” Johnson said in a Monday statement. “The information being sought is a crucial step in bringing greater transparency to Secretary Clinton’s ‘extremely careless’ — I would call it dangerously reckless and grossly negligent — email practices. I hope the information we will obtain will inform policy changes that can prevent similar misconduct in the future.”