Energy Brief: Week in Review & What’s Ahead

Week in Review

Republicans pitch carbon tax to White House

  • A group of former Republican secretaries of State, Treasury, and Labor pitched White House advisers on a proposal for a carbon tax and dividend system, calling it the most conservative solution to climate change.
  • The White House has not commented on the proposal, but the group’s founder said the advisers “really understood the policy,” and “gave some favorable comments about it.”

Construction restarts on Dakota Access

  • The company behind the Dakota Access pipeline restarted construction on the portion that had attracted protests after the Army Corps of Engineers granted the company an easement to continue construction on federal land.

Renewables passed milestones in 2016

  • The U.S. added 22 gigawatts of renewable energy capacity in 2016, a record for annual renewable installations.
  • Wind energy surpassed conventional hydropower in late 2016 as the top renewable energy source in the U.S. in terms of installed capacity, according to the American Wind Energy Association.
  • Nearly 90 percent of electrical capacity installed in Europe in 2016 was from renewable sources.
  • Beijing announced plans to cut 30 percent of its coal consumption in 2017.

What’s Ahead

  • The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee will hold a hearing on the Endangered Species Act on Wednesday.
  • Two House Science subcommittees will hold a joint hearing on the Department of Energy’s loan guarantee program on Wednesday.
  • A House Energy and Commerce subcommittee will hold a hearing on electricity delivery systems on Wednesday.
  • The House is slated to take up a resolution of disapproval under the Congressional Review Act of a Department of the Interior rule on fish and wildlife population control in Alaskan national wildlife refuges.
  • A House Energy and Commerce subcommittee will hold a hearing on how environmental regulations affect the expansion of infrastructure on Thursday.
  • The House Science Committee will hold a hearing on NASA on Thursday.

Events Calendar (All Times Local)

Monday
No events scheduled
Tuesday
House Energy and Commerce subcommittee hearing on self-driving cars 10:15 a.m.
House Rules Committee meeting on resolution of disapproval on Interior 3 p.m.
Wednesday
Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing on Endangered Species Act 10 a.m.
House Energy and Commerce subcommittee hearing on energy transmission 10 a.m.
House Science subcommittee hearing on DOE loan guarantees 10 a.m.
Atlantic Council event on U.S. and German power sector transitions 12:30 p.m.
Thursday
House Energy and Commerce subcommittee hearing on infrastructure and environmental laws 10 a.m.
House Science Committee hearing on NASA 10 a.m.
CSIS event on oil and gas markets 10 a.m.
Friday
No events scheduled

 

Morning Consult Energy Top Reads

1) Trump order will be hard to overturn — legal experts
Amanda Reilly, Greenwire

2) Former interior secretary Jewell says Army is ‘reneging’ on its commitments on Dakota Access pipeline
Juliet Eilperin, The Washington Post

3) Scott Pruitt Is Seen Cutting the E.P.A. With a Scalpel, Not a Cleaver
Coral Davenport, The New York Times

4) U.S. EPA employees protest Trump’s pick to run agency
Valerie Volcovici, Reuters

5) ‘A Conservative Climate Solution’: Republican Group Calls for Carbon Tax
John Schwartz, The New York Times

6) Trump EPA Weighs Shuttering Enforcement Office But Prospects Unclear
Inside EPA

7) Trump’s Team Urges Freeze to Program That Aided Solyndra
Ari Natter, Bloomberg Politics

8) A Crack in an Antarctic Ice Shelf Grew 17 Miles in the Last Two Months
Jugal K. Patel, The New York Times

9) Congress tees up more votes on Obama rules
Devin Henry, The Hill

10) Trump sued over ‘1-in-2-out’ regulations order
Tim Devaney, The Hill

Briefings

Energy Brief: Trump Administration Disbands Advisory Panel on Climate Change

The Trump administration let the charter for the Advisory Committee for the Sustained National Climate Assessment Climate expire on Sunday. On Friday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s acting administrator informed the head of the 15-person federal advisory panel that NOAA would not renew the committee tasked with creating actionable plans for the National Climate Review, a recurring report that’s next due in 2018.

Energy Brief: Week in Review & What’s Ahead

A special science section of the National Climate Assessment and a separate report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration show the severe effects of climate change on the United States, potentially making it more difficult for President Donald Trump to roll back his predecessor’s environmental regulations.

Load More