Washington Brief: Week in Review & What’s Ahead

Week in Review

The White House

  • President Donald Trump met with Russian President Vladimir Putin, a high-profile encounter that took place on the sidelines of the Group of 20 summit in Hamburg, Germany. The leaders exchanged pleasantries before the cameras and then discussed Syria, Ukraine and global terrorism.
  • After North Korea said it successfully tested an intercontinental ballistic missile, the top American general in South Korea said “self-restraint” is the only thing stopping the United States and South Korea from going to war with North Korea.
  • Sixty percent of registered U.S. voters support Trump’s revised travel ban on visitors from six predominantly Muslim countries, according to a recent poll, which also found that the temporary ban may be more popular when it is separated from the president.

Congress

  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said if Republicans do not pass their own health care bill then he will have to negotiate with Democrats to pass legislation to stabilize insurance markets.
  • In Kansas, Sen. Jerry Moran (R) got an earful at town hall meetings, at one point being asked by a voter why Republicans are focused on repealing and replacing Obamacare instead of making it better. At a town hall meeting of at least 250 people, including Republican constituents, in Ashland, Mo., not a single voter raised their hand when asked by Sen. Claire McCaskill (D) if they support the GOP’s health care bill.
  • Republicans have yet to secure a candidate to challenge McCaskill in 2018 following news that Rep. Ann Wagner (R-Mo.) would attempt to unseat the Democratic incumbent. In order to avoid a competitive GOP primary, officials and political consultants said they want state Attorney General Josh Hawley to decide soon if he’ll challenge McCaskill in next year’s midterm elections.
  • In Nevada, the Democratic establishment, still led by former Sen. Harry Reid, solidified behind first-term Rep. Jacky Rosen to challenge Sen. Dean Heller (R) for re-election. While fellow Rep. Dina Titus (D) is still considering a Senate run as well, national groups such as the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and EMILY’s List have already endorsed Rosen.

What’s Ahead

  • The Senate is scheduled to reconvene on Monday, when it will vote on the nomination of Neomi Rao to be administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. The House reconvenes on Tuesday.
  • The Senate Judiciary Committee is set to hold a confirmation hearing Wednesday for Christopher Wray, Trump’s nominee to lead the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
  • Rep. Diane Black (R-Tenn.), chairwoman of the House Budget Committee, said the panel may mark up its 2018 budget resolution as soon as this week.
  • At the invitation of French President Emmanuel Macron, Trump will be back in Europe on Friday to celebrate Bastille Day.

Calendar Events (All Times Local)

Monday
No events scheduled
Tuesday
Sen. Markey, Reps. Tonko, Costello speak at Congressional Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency EXPO 9:30 a.m.
Former Senate Majority Leaders Daschle, Frist speak at BPC event on health care 10 a.m.
Sen. McCain, Tunisia chief of government speak at Heritage Foundation event 11 a.m.
Wednesday
Sen. Casey, former Sen. Lugar speak at CSIS event on global food security 8:30 a.m.
Confirmation hearing for FBI director nominee Christopher Wray 9:30 a.m.
Sens. Flake, Kaine speak at Wilson Center event on ISIS 9:30 a.m.
Fed’s Yellen testifies before House Financial Services Committee 10 a.m.
Alaska Gov. Walker speaks at National Press Club 10 a.m.
Heritage Foundation event on causes, costs and consequences of U.S. debt 12 p.m.
Thursday
House Ways and Means Committee hearing on tax reform 10 a.m.
Fed’s Yellen testifies before Senate Banking Committee 10 a.m.
Rep. Cicilline speaks at Brookings Institution event on manufacturing 9 a.m.
Friday
No events scheduled

 

Morning Consult Washington Top Reads

1) Trump Considers ‘Severe Things’ Over North Korea Threat
Peter Nicholas, The Wall Street Journal

2) Here’s what’s at stake when Trump finally meets Putin
David Filipov and Abby Phillip, The Washington Post

3) Poll: Majority of voters back Trump travel ban
Steven Shepard, Politico

4) McConnell Downplays Prospect of Passing Health Care Bill
Leigh Ann Caldwell and Kasie Hunt, NBC News

5) The Flashpoints for World Leaders at the Hamburg G-20
Alan Crawford and Sam Dodge, Bloomberg News

6) Senators, Visiting Afghanistan, Warn Trump Over Diplomatic Vacancies
Mujib Mashal, The New York Times

7) To Avoid Senate Primary Fight, Missouri Republicans Want Hawley to Decide
Eli Yokley, Morning Consult

8) Senate Judiciary Committee to hold confirmation hearing for Trump’s FBI pick next week
Austin Wright, Politico

9) U.S. ethics chief who pressured Trump resigns
Madeline Conway, Politico

10) White House gender pay gap more than triples under Trump
Christopher Ingraham, The Washington Post

Briefings

Washington Brief: Week in Review & What’s Ahead

President Donald Trump defended his eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., after it was revealed that in June 2016 he met with a Russian lawyer who has ties to the Kremlin. The meeting came after he was led to believe the lawyer would provide damaging information about Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, and that the information was part of the Russian government’s effort to assist his father’s presidential campaign. The meeting included a Russian-American lawyer who’s a former Russian intelligence officer

Washington Brief: Trump Says He Didn’t Learn of Son’s Meeting With Russian Lawyer Until This Week

President Donald Trump said he did not hear “until a couple of days ago” about a June 2016 meeting between his son, Donald Trump Jr., and a Russian lawyer who might have had damaging information on Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. He also said he spent more than 20 minutes of his two-hour meeting last week with Russian President Vladimir Putin pressing him on election meddling.

Washington Brief: Week in Review & What’s Ahead

The Supreme Court allowed part of President Donald Trump’s travel ban to take effect, while saying the temporary restrictions could not be imposed on people who have a “bona fide relationship” with a person or entity in the United States. Hawaii brought forth a legal challenge that asked a federal judge to clarify whether the Department of Homeland Security violated the Supreme Court’s instructions regarding which family members qualify as having bona fide relationships.

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