REPORT PREVIEW
Building A Brand Women Want to Work For
What initiatives companies should take to attract talented female employees

A new report from Morning Consult looks at how companies can build a reputation as a place that workers want to be a part of, from strategic political activism to pursuing a mission beyond profit.

Included in this report is breakout data outlining areas where companies can better appeal to women. Below are several key findings. 

Note: the data points are all among white collar men and women who aren’t retired or have plans to retire in the next five years. The full report contains data on both white collar and blue collar workers. 

Women care more about working for a purpose beyond profit

27% of women say they would consider working for a company that didn’t have a clear purpose beyond turning profit. Among men, that rises to 47%. 

Similarly, women are more likely to care about a company’s mission. Just 27% of women say they would consider working for a company if they didn’t agree with mission, while men are more open to the possibility, with 42% saying they would consider it.

Companies taking political stances matter less to women

44% of women say it’s important that they agree with the political positions of the company they work for, compared to 54% of men. 

The report also digs into what political issues matter most to potential employees. One of the more interesting gender divides came with support for President Tump: 19% of women say they’re more likely to want to work for a company that issued a positive statement about Trump, while 37% say they would be less likely. Among men, 35% are more likely and 36% are less.

The tech industry's pull isn't as strong for women

50% of women would consider a job in the tech industry, assuming the position and compensation was the right fit. That jumps to 74% for men – the largest gender gap of any industry tested. 

Related: Tech dominates the Most Admired Employer list

Women are also less intrigued by the prospect of working for a large corporation. Just 27% of women say they’re very interested in working for a large corporation, compared to 40% of men.

Making an effort to promote women can help attract both men and women

74% of women say they would be more likely to want to work for a company that made an effort to hire women to leadership positions. While men are less enthused about that initiative, a majority (57%) nonetheless say the same. 

Additionally, 56% of women and 57% of men say they would be more likely to want to work for a company that made an effort to promote people of color to leadership positions.

Download the free report below to get more data on what your brand can do to attract talented employees. 

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