The Most (And Least) Popular Senators In America

Update: The most recent rankings are available here.

Sen. Bernie Sanders may have watched his final hopes of being the Democratic presidential nominee flame out Tuesday night, but when he eventually heads home he can return knowing the people of Vermont still love him. Even after months of battling with front-runner Hillary Clinton on the campaign trail, Sanders remains the most popular senator in America.

Based on interviews with more than 62,000 registered voters since January, Morning Consult crunched how constituents felt about their home-state senators. Sanders maintained his spot at the top of the list from November, with an 80 percent approval rating.

Other presidential contenders saw mixed results from the campaign trail. Florida Republican Marco Rubio’s approval rating dropped 5 points from November, down to 45 percent. His disapproval ratings increased 8 points to 41 percent. Texas Republican Sen. Ted Cruz, who is still competing for the Republican nomination, saw his approval rating increase 3 points to 55 percent with Texans, while his disapproval numbers went down two points to 30 percent.

The least popular senator also hasn’t changed since we last released these results: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has the highest disapproval rating in the Senate, with 49 percent of Kentuckians saying they don’t have a favorable impression of him.

Click on each senators' name to get a closer look at the data in Morning Consult Intelligence, where you can see how opinion on each senator changed over time.

Morning Consult conducted this analysis using interviews with more than 62,000 registered voters from January 8, 2016 to April 17, 2016. On each poll, participants indicated whether they approved or disapproved of the job performance of President Barack Obama, their state governor, senators, representative and their mayor, if they lived in a city with more than about 10,000 residents.

For each question, they could answer strongly approve, somewhat approve, somewhat disapprove, strongly disapprove, or don’t know / no opinion. Survey respondents were assigned their governor and senators based on their state of residence, their representative based on a combination of zip code, IP address, latitude and longitude, and their mayor based on their state and zip code.

The results include population parameters for registered voters from the November 2012 Current Population Survey (CPS). We applied post-stratification weights based on gender, age, educational attainment and race. The median state includes a total of 935 respondents, the state with the most respondents is California (n = 5,456) and the state with the least respondents is Wyoming (n = 157).

State NameApproveDisapproveDon’t Know/No OpinionMargin of ErrorSenatorParty
Alabama59%28%13%3%Richard ShelbyRepublican
Alabama54%25%21%3%Jefferson SessionsRepublican
Alaska55%23%21%7%Dan SullivanRepublican
Alaska59%21%20%7%Lisa MurkowskiRepublican
Arizona42%35%23%3%Jeff FlakeRepublican
Arizona49%42%9%3%John McCainRepublican
Arkansas50%32%18%4%Tom CottonRepublican
Arkansas47%25%28%4%John BoozmanRepublican
California51%32%16%1%Barbara BoxerDemocrat
California52%32%16%1%Dianne FeinsteinDemocrat
Colorado51%27%22%3%Cory GardnerRepublican
Colorado46%26%28%3%Michael BennetDemocrat
Connecticut59%27%14%4%Richard BlumenthalDemocrat
Connecticut53%27%20%4%Christopher MurphyDemocrat
Delaware69%20%11%6%Thomas CarperDemocrat
Delaware63%24%13%6%Chris CoonsDemocrat
Florida52%24%24%2%Bill NelsonDemocrat
Florida45%41%14%2%Marco RubioRepublican
Georgia50%23%27%2%John IsaksonRepublican
Georgia51%24%25%2%David PerdueRepublican
Hawaii46%33%21%6%Brian SchatzDemocrat
Hawaii52%28%21%6%Mazie HironoDemocrat
Idaho51%28%21%5%Michael CrapoRepublican
Idaho47%26%27%5%James RischRepublican
Illinois43%36%21%2%Richard DurbinDemocrat
Illinois39%33%29%2%Mark KirkRepublican
Indiana50%24%27%3%Daniel CoatsRepublican
Indiana48%24%28%3%Joe DonnellyDemocrat
Iowa55%29%16%4%Charles GrassleyRepublican
Iowa47%32%21%4%Joni ErnstRepublican
Kansas41%31%28%4%Jerry MoranRepublican
Kansas40%42%19%4%Pat RobertsRepublican
Kentucky40%49%11%3%Mitch McConnellRepublican
Kentucky51%35%14%3%Rand PaulRepublican
Louisiana40%31%29%4%Bill CassidyRepublican
Louisiana44%40%16%4%David VitterRepublican
Maine74%14%11%5%Angus KingIndependent
Maine79%13%8%5%Susan CollinsRepublican
Maryland54%18%28%3%Benjamin CardinDemocrat
Maryland60%21%18%3%Barbara MikulskiDemocrat
Massachusetts61%27%12%3%Elizabeth WarrenDemocrat
Massachusetts51%19%30%3%Edward MarkeyDemocrat
Michigan48%34%17%2%Debbie StabenowDemocrat
Michigan38%28%34%2%Gary PetersDemocrat
Minnesota63%26%11%3%Alan FrankenDemocrat
Minnesota68%21%11%3%Amy KlobucharDemocrat
Mississippi53%28%19%4%Thad CochranRepublican
Mississippi46%25%29%4%Roger WickerRepublican
Missouri48%38%15%3%Claire McCaskillDemocrat
Missouri49%29%22%3%Roy BluntRepublican
Montana48%40%12%6%Jon TesterDemocrat
Montana59%23%18%6%Steve DainesRepublican
Nebraska53%30%17%5%Deb FischerRepublican
Nebraska50%28%22%5%Benjamin SasseRepublican
Nevada45%41%14%4%Harry ReidDemocrat
Nevada48%22%30%4%Dean HellerRepublican
New Hampshire54%35%10%6%Kelly AyotteRepublican
New Hampshire58%33%9%6%Jeanne ShaheenDemocrat
New Jersey42%32%26%2%Robert MenendezDemocrat
New Jersey52%24%24%2%Cory BookerDemocrat
New Mexico57%23%20%5%Tom UdallDemocrat
New Mexico49%24%27%5%Martin HeinrichDemocrat
New York62%23%15%2%Charles SchumerDemocrat
New York56%20%24%2%Kirsten GillibrandDemocrat
North Carolina44%29%28%2%Richard BurrRepublican
North Carolina41%32%27%2%Thom TillisRepublican
North Dakota50%35%15%6%Heidi HeitkampDemocrat
North Dakota74%10%16%6%John HoevenRepublican
Ohio50%27%23%2%Sherrod BrownDemocrat
Ohio44%24%32%2%Robert PortmanRepublican
Oklahoma47%26%28%4%James LankfordRepublican
Oklahoma49%29%22%4%James InhofeRepublican
Oregon52%23%25%3%Jeff MerkleyDemocrat
Oregon58%21%21%3%Ron WydenDemocrat
Pennsylvania46%28%27%2%Patrick ToomeyRepublican
Pennsylvania47%27%26%2%Robert CaseyDemocrat
Rhode Island52%33%15%6%Sheldon WhitehouseDemocrat
Rhode Island59%25%16%6%John ReedDemocrat
South Carolina48%33%19%3%Lindsey GrahamRepublican
South Carolina50%18%31%3%Tim ScottRepublican
South Dakota62%26%13%7%John ThuneRepublican
South Dakota51%29%20%7%Mike RoundsRepublican
Tennessee53%29%18%3%Lamar AlexanderRepublican
Tennessee50%29%21%3%Bob CorkerRepublican
Texas55%30%14%2%Ted CruzRepublican
Texas45%23%33%2%John CornynRepublican
Utah49%41%10%4%Orrin HatchRepublican
Utah48%29%23%4%Mike LeeRepublican
Vermont80%17%2%7%Bernard SandersIndependent
Vermont73%19%8%7%Patrick LeahyDemocrat
Virginia62%21%16%2%Mark WarnerDemocrat
Virginia53%24%23%2%Timothy KaineDemocrat
Washington57%27%16%3%Patty MurrayDemocrat
Washington55%24%21%3%Maria CantwellDemocrat
West Virginia57%25%18%4%Shelley CapitoRepublican
West Virginia57%30%13%4%Joe ManchinDemocrat
Wisconsin43%32%25%3%Ron JohnsonRepublican
Wisconsin43%37%21%3%Tammy BaldwinDemocrat
Wyoming65%27%8%8%John BarrassoRepublican
Wyoming58%21%21%8%Michael EnziRepublican

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