UPDATED: NOV. 4, 2021

Taking the Temperature: An Energy and Climate Tracker

BY LISA MARTINE JENKINS

As emissions mount and the globe continues to warm, climate change and the energy transition are increasingly on the public’s mind, both in terms of how they regard their own choices and whether they approve of their governments’ approaches.

Taking the Temperature represents Morning Consult’s ongoing effort to track how the U.S. public feels about energy and climate. It includes regularly updated climate concern and disaster concern trackers, broken down by party, race/ethnicity and generation, as well as a collection of stories based on other trended data on energy sources, fuel and electricity prices and more. Sign up for alerts below.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

Overall concern about climate change from the U.S. public has remained relatively steady since late summer, though the share of adults who say they are “very concerned” appears to have waxed and waned as climate has figured prominently in the news, peaking in the days after the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released its bleak assessment on Aug. 9. Read more.

Meanwhile, public concern about the local impacts of disasters saw a bump over the course of the summer as the frequency of disasters themselves mounted, before dropping again with the start of autumn. Read more.

In advance of President Joe Biden’s arrival at COP26, the share of voters that “strongly” approve of his administration’s handling of climate change had shrunk to 17% from its peak of 25%; this is driven largely by a drop among Democrats, from 46% to 32%. Read more.

The public has an overwhelmingly positive opinion of zero-emissions energy sources like solar and wind, with natural gas (a fossil fuel) close behind. Fossil fuels across the board elicit a stark partisan divide, with oil and coal especially favored by Republicans at much higher rates than by Democrats. Read more.

As both natural gas and oil prices increase globally — a fact most visible to U.S. consumers at the pump — a growing share of the public says it is “very concerned” about both current and future gasoline and electricity prices. Read more.

Tracking Climate Concern: All Adults
U.S. adults were asked how concerned they are with the issue of climate change and its impact
Weekly surveys are conducted among roughly 2,200 U.S. adults (including roughly 2,000 registered voters) and have a margin of error of +/-2%.

Tracking Climate Concern: Demographics
Share of U.S. adults who are "very concerned" about climate change and its impacts, by demographic
Weekly surveys are conducted among roughly 2,200 U.S. adults (including roughly 2,000 registered voters) and have a margin of error of +/-2%.

Tracking Disaster Concern: All Adults
U.S. adults are asked in weekly surveys how concerned they are about the impact of natural disasters on their community
Weekly surveys are conducted among roughly 2,200 U.S. adults (including roughly 2,000 registered voters) and have a margin of error of +/-2%.

Tracking Disaster Concern: Demographics
Share of U.S. adults who are "very concerned" about the impact of natural disasters on their community, by demographic
Weekly surveys are conducted among roughly 2,200 U.S. adults (including roughly 2,000 registered voters) and have a margin of error of +/-2%.

Subscribe

Our Best Intel

A Roundup of Morning Consult's Latest Data, Charts & Insights

All fields are required

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!